What The Shields Mean

EN-374-group
EN374:2003 CHEMICAL & MICRO-ORGANISMS

A. EN374-2: Gloves must pass this test (at least a Performance level 2) in order to prove that they are an effective barrier against liquids and micro-organisms.
B. EN374-3: Resistance to permeation is assessed by measuring the time for a chemical to break through the glove material. Chemicals tested against are designated by an identifying letter from A-L.
C. EN374-3: Limited Chemical: To be used for gloves that do not achieve a breakthrough time of at least 30 minutes against 3 chemicals, but passes EN374-2 AQL 4 or lower.

 

EN-388

EN388:2003 MECHANICAL RISKS (EUROPE)

Is the standard for protection against mechanical hazards which is expressed by a pictogram followed by four numbers (performance levels), each representing test performance against a specific hazard. Gloves are tested for abrasion (0-4), cut Coup Test (0-5), tear (0-5) and puncture (0-5). New to the EN388 test which is still in the revision process is the TDM cut test. The rating will be represented by letters A-F which will be the last digit on the shield.

 

EN-511

EN511:2006 PROTECTION FROM COLD

Is the standard for protection from cold. Two things are measured with the glove:
1. How the glove’s material leads cold, and 2. The material’s insulating capacity (with contact). The last digit next to the pictogram shows if water penetrates the glove after 30 minutes. The pictogram will be accompanied by a 3-digit code.

 

EN-407

EN407:2004 THERMAL HAZARDS

Is the standard for protection from thermal hazards. The nature and degree of protection is shown by a pictogram followed by a series of six performance levels, relating to specific protective qualities. The higher the number, the better the test result. The following is tested: resistance to flammability, resistance to contact heat, resistance to convective heat, resistance to radiant heat, resistance to small splashes of molten metal, resistance to large splashes of molten metal.

ANSI

ANSI: MECHANICAL RISKS

Is the North American ANSI/ISEA 105-2011 standard for Protective Gloves Against Mechanical Risks. In 2016 the standard changed to create consistency between the ANSI and EN388 test methods which is called the ASTM F2992-15. New to the 2016 revision of the Ansi/ISEA 105 standard is a more expanded level of classification of cut resistance. The results of the ANSI ASTM F2992-15 cut test method will feature 9 levels of cut resistance, which will be expressed as A1-A9.

 

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